PHARMACEUTICAL AND MEDICINAL PROPERTIES OF GLUTATHIONE: AN OVERVIEW

  • Sarvananda University of Peradeniya
  • Amal D. Premarathna Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9748-398X
Keywords: Antioxidant, Cell death, Stress, Depression, Anti aging

Abstract

Glutathione is an antioxidant, which presents in mammalian and known as the most powerful antioxidant. Glutathione is called as “Master Antioxidant” due to its intracellular and possesses the aptitude to exploit the performance of other antioxidants, these include vitamins C & E, CoQ10 (ubiquinone) and alpha-lipoic acid, and rich in fresh vegetables and fruits. The major role of Glutathione is to the protection of cells and mitochondria from oxidative and peroxidative damage also needed for cleansing, energy utilization, reduction of aging-associated diseases, elimination of toxins from the cells, and protection from the damaging effects of radiation, chemicals, and environmental pollutants. Our body’s ability to produce glutathione decreases as you age. This review suggests that Glutathione can recommend as the best therapeutic agent in pharma industries and skin-lightening agent in cosmetic industries.

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Published
2019-06-09
How to Cite
Sarvananda, & D. Premarathna, A. (2019). PHARMACEUTICAL AND MEDICINAL PROPERTIES OF GLUTATHIONE: AN OVERVIEW. Mintage Journal of Pharmaceutical and Medical Sciences (ISSN: 2320-3315). Retrieved from http://mjpms.in/index.php/mjpms/article/view/465